Category: Film/Video

Documentary Photography: Japan 2015-2016: Screening “Sans Soleil” ?>

Documentary Photography: Japan 2015-2016: Screening “Sans Soleil”


Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from the course Documentary Photography: Japan 2015-2016 for a screening of Chris Marker’s 1983 film, Sans Soleil.

Wednesday, November 4, 2014, 6PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24H:”espresso room”

A complex journey into time and memory, Chris Marker’s mind-bending free-form travelogue roams from Africa to Japan, guided by associative editing and an unnamed narrator. –The Criterion Collection

Read Chris Marker: Memory’s Apostle By Catherine Lupton
Read the Sans Soleil script

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Screening: Katsuhiro Otomo’s “Akira” ?>

Screening: Katsuhiro Otomo’s “Akira”

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from the course Documentary Photography: Japan 2014-2015 for a screening of Katsuhiro Otomo’s1988 landmark film, Akira (in BluRay).

Tuesday, December 9, 2014, 6PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

It’s an oldie, but certainly a goodie, in fact, the grandfather of contemporary anime. The influence of this movie can not be overstated.

One of the best-known examples of contemporary Japanese animation, this cyberpunk adventure takes place in the post-apocalyptic city of Neo-Tokyo. A teen-age boy is exposed to a mysterious energy source and develops telekinetic powers that place him at the center of a conflict that may destroy the world.Rotten Tomatoes

Read from The Guardian:
Akira: the future-Tokyo story that brought anime west

Dystopian Tokyo 2019 has never looked better. Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Jiro Dreams of Sushi ?>

Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from The Gabelli School of Business course Marketing and the City: Tokyo for a screening of David Gelb’s 2011 film, Jiro Dreams of Sushi.
Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 6:30 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is the story of 85-year-old Jiro Ono, considered by many to be the world’s greatest sushi chef. He is the proprietor of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant inauspiciously located in a Tokyo subway station. Despite its humble appearances, it is the first restaurant of its kind to be awarded a prestigious three-star Michelin Guide rating, and sushi lovers from around the globe make repeated pilgrimage, calling months in advance and shelling out top dollar for a coveted seat at Jiro’s sushi bar.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a thoughtful and elegant meditation on work, family, and the art of perfection, chronicling Jiro’s life as both an unparalleled success in the culinary world and as a loving yet complicated father. –Magnolia Pictures

Food and friends are both welcome.
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Film Screening: Gerry ?>

Film Screening: Gerry

 

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers for a screening of Gus Van Sant’s 2002 film, Gerry.
Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 11:30 AM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

No description included for fear of plot spoiling; however, I can say clearly that there is walking and landscape. Who needs more?

Food and friends are both welcome.
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Film Screening: It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World ?>

Film Screening: It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers in collaboration with Professor Pics for a screening of Stanley Kramer’s 1963 film It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 6:00 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

The dying words of a thief spark a madcap cross-country rush to find some treasure. With this all-star Cinerama epic, producer/director Stanley Kramer vowed to make the comedy that would end all comedies. The story begins during a massive traffic jam, caused by reckless driver Smiler Grogan (Jimmy Durante), who, before (literally) kicking the bucket, cryptically tells the assembled drivers that he’s buried a fortune in stolen loot, under the Big W. The various motorists setting out on a mad scramble include a dentist (Sid Caesar) and his wife (Edie Adams); a henpecked husband (Milton Berle) accompanied by his mother-in-law (Ethel Merman) and his beatnik brother-in-law (Dick Shawn); a pair of comedy writers (Buddy Hackett and Mickey Rooney); and a variety of assorted nuts including a slow-wit (Jonathan Winters), a wheeler-dealer (Phil Silvers), and a pair of covetous cabdrivers (Peter Falk and Eddie Rochester Anderson). Monitoring every move that the fortune hunters make is a scrupulously honest police detective (Spencer Tracy). Virtually every lead, supporting, and bit part in the picture is filled by a well-known comic actor: the laughspinning lineup also includes Carl Reiner, Terry-Thomas, Arnold Stang, Buster Keaton, Jack Benny, Jerry Lewis, and The Three Stooges, who get one of the picture’s biggest laughs by standing stock still and uttering not a word. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

Unparalleled, zany comedy. Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Bill Cunningham New York ?>

Bill Cunningham New York

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers for a screening of Bill Cunningham New York by Richard Press.
“We all get dressed for Bill,” says Vogue editrix Anna Wintour.The “Bill” in question is 80+ New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham. For decades, this Schwinn-riding cultural anthropologist has been obsessively and inventively chronicling fashion trends and high society charity soirées for the Times Style section in his columns “On the Street” and “Evening Hours.” Documenting uptown fixtures (Wintour, Tom Wolfe, Brooke Astor, David Rockefeller—who all appear in the film out of their love for Bill), downtown eccentrics and everyone in between, Cunningham’s enormous body of work is more reliable than any catwalk as an expression of time, place and individual flair. In turn, Bill Cunningham New York is a delicate, funny and often poignant portrait of a dedicated artist whose only wealth is his own humanity and unassuming grace.

February 11, 2014, 12 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi) ?>

Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi)

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and the participants in the 2013-2014 Documentary Photography: Japan course for a screening of Hayao Miyazaki’s 2001 film Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi). Food and friends are welcome.
November 15, 2013, 6:00 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
All the visible features of an area of countryside or land, often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal ?>

All the visible features of an area of countryside or land, often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal

All the visible features of an area of countryside or land, often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal

Curator: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

Including: John Calhoun, Sigrid Jakob, Saul Metnick, Chihiro Nishio, Kota Sake, Daniel Seiple, and Eric van Hove

The Center Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center
June 10 – July 19, 2013
Reception: Monday, June 10, 6 – 8
http://fordhamuniversitycentergallery.com

All the visible features of an area of countryside or land, often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal brings together seven artists from Belgium, Germany, Japan, and the United States working in different mediums to explore the idea of what a landscape can potentially be. The lengthy title of this exhibition is simply a dictionary definition of the word “landscape;” however, it hints at the complexity of what a landscape is, particularly in regards to the notion of visibility. The artists in this exhibition continually play with this prerequisite of visibility as stated in the dictionary definition and nowhere is this questioning more evident than in the ephemeral space delineated by a rainbow on the exhibition’s invitation. The American author Rebecca Solnit wrote in her book, Wanderlust: A History of Walking, that “A path is a prior interpretation of the best way to traverse a landscape.” In light of this quotation, this exhibition is a landscape without a path, or perhaps seven different paths of varying natures.

John Calhoun’s monumental time-lapse drawing chronicles a period of 77 days in the studio between 2010 and 2013. Examined at the micro level, the drawings resemble psychological Rorschach tests, yet the numerous smaller elements come together to create a much larger image of a lake in northern Germany. The work simultaneously represents both a description of place, in addition to a description of an unfolding process over time.

One Kilometer by Sigrid Jakob is an ongoing forensic investigation into a peripheral area of fields and forest just outside the village of her birth. This area is a prime example of bucolic southern German countryside, and serves a variety of uses such as agriculture, hunting, and recreation. However, vague childhood memories, rumors, and odd apparitions suggest other time periods and other uses. Over the years, Sigrid Jakob has attempted to piece together the full story of this landscape through research, photography, and interviews with witnesses.

The ten black and white images by Saul Metnick are an excerpt from an ongoing exploration of the transitions, in-betweens, and non-spaces encountered during travels in the Southwest. The body of work examines the rapid and recent growth in Colorado and Nevada, particularly focused on the overwhelmingly utilitarian and non-descript aesthetic of the architecture, the perfunctory engineering, and the often overlooked spaces.

A View, by Chihiro Nishio, consists of a drawing and a video documenting the artist in a studio setting as she repeatedly attempts to trace passing vehicles from a projected video. This ongoing activity has been presented in Japan as site-specific work in progress with the drawings made in pencil directly on the wall; however, in this iteration for Fordham University’s Center Gallery the drawings have been translated into vinyl and applied directly to the gallery’s glass walls and doors. What upon first inspection presents itself as decorative filigree, turns out to be directly related to a rigorous, yet absurd endeavor.

Kota Sake’s Menu, is a 48 page, 7” x 7” book containing an assortment of dishes prepared for him at Kagawa, an establishment located in front of his studio in the neighborhood of Araiyakushi in Tokyo, Japan. Kagawa is a small, local izakaya (a type of Japanese drinking establishment which also serves food), so most customers live in the area and come after work. The food at Kagawa is not particularly fancy Japanese food, nor is it instant, fast food. For Sake, going to Kagawa to eat carefully made foods, drink Sapporo beer, and meet with locals is relaxing and provides a sense of home after a long day.

Daniel Seiple’s collaborative project with woodcarver Gavin Smith, Can’t see the trees for the wood, takes place at Smith’s home in Corgarff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Guided as much by intuition and instincts as conversation, Seiple walks, drinks, and eats with Smith, then finally clears his barnyard, which is overrun with weeds and littered with large stacks of wood. In order to salvage the boards, they are stacked in the form of a five-ton house inspired by the British Arts & Crafts movement. A tunnel leads to a staircase, which ascends to the roof, from which Smith can overlook his clutter and view the landscape.

Making Sidi Ali Rainbows is a video by Eric van Hove made in Marrakesh in 2011, as well as this exhibition’s invitation image. The artist, standing in an empty pool, repeatedly spits mouthfuls of a popular spring water brand (Sidi Ali) and creates a series of small rainbows. The duration of the event is brief and dictated by the amount of water held by the bottle.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock, 2013

Image caption: Making Sidi Ali Rainbows, Eric van Hove, video still, total running time 170 seconds, 2011

Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers/Professor Pics ?>

Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers/Professor Pics

A daring, collaborative evening between Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and Professor Pics (Selected by Professor Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Professor Ross McClaren).

Berberian Sound Studio by Peter Strickland, 2012, will be screened at 6PM in the film classroom on Thursday, April 18 (in Bluray!).

“A sound engineer’s work for an Italian horror studio becomes a terrifying case of life imitating art.”

Bonus feature: Dario Argento’s Inferno. Come enjoy the horror…