Category: Japan

Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014 Book ?>

Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014 Book

By Quinrui Hua, Leah Kirsch, Isabelle Langley, Giovani Santoro, Maggie Wilson, and Xuan Zheng. Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock. Print Book, 80 Pages, landscape, 10 × 8 in. (25 × 20 cm).

Click HERE for book preview.

This book is the final culmination of the course Documentary Photography: Japan offered by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock through the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University.

The course description is as follows: This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan. The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa.

Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno. Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186 mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi ?>

Jiro Dreams of Sushi

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from The Gabelli School of Business course Marketing and the City: Tokyo for a screening of David Gelb’s 2011 film, Jiro Dreams of Sushi.
Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 6:30 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is the story of 85-year-old Jiro Ono, considered by many to be the world’s greatest sushi chef. He is the proprietor of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant inauspiciously located in a Tokyo subway station. Despite its humble appearances, it is the first restaurant of its kind to be awarded a prestigious three-star Michelin Guide rating, and sushi lovers from around the globe make repeated pilgrimage, calling months in advance and shelling out top dollar for a coveted seat at Jiro’s sushi bar.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a thoughtful and elegant meditation on work, family, and the art of perfection, chronicling Jiro’s life as both an unparalleled success in the culinary world and as a loving yet complicated father. –Magnolia Pictures

Food and friends are both welcome.
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi) ?>

Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi)

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and the participants in the 2013-2014 Documentary Photography: Japan course for a screening of Hayao Miyazaki’s 2001 film Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi). Food and friends are welcome.
November 15, 2013, 6:00 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014 ?>

Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014

Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014
 
This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan.
The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa. Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno.
Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186 mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests.

Preview the class books:

2012-2013 Documentary Photography: Japan here.
2011-2012: 六人のニューヨークの写真家が日本にいます (Six New York Photographers in Japan)
2010-2011: One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan here.

All books edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
For further information please contact: Professor Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
The new Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013 book! ?>

The new Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013 book!

Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013

By Sam Anacker, Adam Hemmert, Hyun Woo Kim, Jaclyn Krakowski, Amanda Mainguy, Andrew Scherer. Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013 is the final culmination of the 2012–2013 course “Documentary Photography: Japan” offered by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock through the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University.

The book is 138 pages, 10×8 inches (25×20 cm), with four-color printing and can be ordered in softcover, or hardback in a range of paper grades. Preview the entire book here.

The course description is as follows:

This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan.

The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa. Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno.

Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186 mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests.

For further information please contact: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock apicellahit@fordham.edu

Introducing the Hayden Hartnett Project Space ?>

Introducing the Hayden Hartnett Project Space

 

Image from the 2010-2011 Hayden Hartnett Portfolio
Printed by Apollonia Colacicco, 2011
 
Fordham University is proud to introduce a new exhibition venue at its Lincoln Center Campus: the Hayden Hartnett Project Space. The space presents yearlong exhibitions of work produced by students from the Department of Theatre and Visual Art.

The location of the Hayden Hartnett Project Space in the Office of Undergraduate Admission in Fordham’s Lincoln Center both showcases student work for an extended period of time, as well as introduces prospective students and their parents to the high caliber of visual work produced at Fordham University. The Hayden Hartnett Project Space is inside the Office of Undergraduate Admission on the second floor of the Leon Lowenstein building and is open during Fordham University operating hours from 9 to 5.
Please visit our website: haydenhartnettprojectspace.comto see our current, past, and upcoming exhibitions in the space, as well as to see the 2010 Hayden Hartnett black & white portfolio from her participation in the Documentary Photography: Japan course offered by the Visual Arts Department. Our mailing list signup form is located on the site; so one can stay informed of what is showing in the Hayden Hartnett Project Space, as well as in our two additional university galleries.
For more information, please contact gallery director Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock at <apicellahit@fordham.edu>
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers ?>

Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers

Yasujiro Ozu’s Tokyo Story (Tokyo Monogatari) follows an aging couple, Tomi and Sukichi, on their journey from their rural village to visit their two married children in bustling, postwar Tokyo. Their reception is disappointing: too busy to entertain them, their children send them off to a health spa. After Tomi falls ill she and Sukichi return home, while the children, grief-stricken, hasten to be with her. From a simple tale unfolds one of the greatest of all Japanese films. Starring Ozu regulars Chishu Ryu and Setsuko Hara, the film reprises one of the director’s favorite themes—that of generational conflict—in a way that is quintessentially Japanese and yet so universal in its appeal that it continues to resonate as one of cinema’s greatest masterpieces.

Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and the participants in the 2012-2013 Documentary Photography: Japan course for a screening of Yasujiro Ozu’s Tokyo Story.
Yasujiro Ozu’s Tokyo Story, 1953
Friday, December 7, 2012, 6 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu